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Psychotherapy and Chemical Imbalances (How to Escape Taking Responsibility)

Many psychotherapists describe their clients as innocent victims of a chemical imbalances, something beyond the control of the client. They tell you that depression, bipolar disorder and most aberrant behaviors cannot be helped and are best treated with drugs.

Not true.

How then, do those professionals explain the fact that people who exhibit multiple personalities change their physiology as they change from one personality to another?

Documented cases reveal a client having diabetes when living as personality A yet normal blood sugar while living as personality B. Personality C may break out in hives while eating a certain food yet a switch to personality D instantly eliminates the itchy bumps.

Body chemistry is not the cause of the seeming personality disorder. What the person thinks and how he or she feels and acts determine the body’s chemistry.

Indeed, as the saying goes, “You are not what you think you are. But what you think – you are.”

Your thoughts create your world. Each individual, therefore, is solely responsible for his mental health. There are no innocent victims – ever.

People who choose to abdicate responsibility for how they live in each moment run self-limiting negative thoughts, often completely outside their awareness, all day long.

Those negative thoughts lower their frequency of vibrations. They find themselves attracting what they do not want in their lives because they can only attract other low vibration people, things and circumstances that vibrate in harmony with them.

Negative thoughts lead to a loss of well being that leads to chemical imbalances. How convenient is that? What a great escape from reality!

Such people, seeking labels that “justify” their lack of productivity or happiness or success, visit psychotherapists and psychiatrists who gladly perpetuate the myth that chemical imbalances cause mental illness.

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